Saturday, June 17, 2006

Teachers/ Librarian's Real Life (Funny) Experiences


We teachers share a calling with librarians, media specialists and other information professionals: questions are at the core of our livelihood. And the questions? Well, like the librarians and teachers and publishers and others who answer them, they come in all shapes and sizes...and all levels of awareness.
******
I had a 9th grade student ask me, "Where are the small books located?" [He was looking for a short novel to read for class]

******

Do I need to rewind my DVD before I return it?

******

Looking at an activity that involved locating books by their Dewey Decimal System, one of my high schoolers asked: "What are these numbers...radio stations?"

******

"Don't you have any tax forms for married people? These all say they are for individuals."

******

From our reference email system:

"I borrowed an article that I have finished reading it, what email address should I use to send the article back?

I've never had anybody want to return an online article before.

******

My favorite, all purpose question from a teen:
"Do you have any books on like, you know?"

******

A 6th grader asked, "Do you have the book on Edgar Allan Pooh by Raven?" [Winnie the Pooh or Raven by Edgar Allan Poe?]
TO BE CONTINUED...
SOURCE: "Funny You Should Ask"... Thomson Gale.

2 comments:

zarah g. said...

Ahahaha! This is so funny!

You're back to regular blogging again, Sol!

peachy l. said...

Thanks for these Sol! They sure are funny

Promethean Planet

DISCLAIMER

The following is the opinion of the writer and is not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual. Any view or opinion represented in the blog comments are personal and is accredited to the respective commentor / visitor to this blog. This blogger reserves the right to moderate comment suitability in support of respecting racial, religious and political sensitivities, and in order to protect the rights of each commentor where available.

Pageviews